Discover the astounding, pulsing life of a seemingly immobile coral reef

Corals and sponges, the undersea lifeforms that make up much of coral reefs, appear still and impassive to the naked eye, unless caught in a current or brushed by another animal. However, in order to survive they’re always in motion, growing slowly and moving to secure sunlight and to prey on zooplankton. Shot over the course of nine months, Slow Life use time-lapse to stunning effect, transforming the creeping, gentle movements of these creatures into colourful pulsations, undulations, and bursts of life.

Video by BioQuest Studios

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Essay/Earth Science

The shape of life

The ancient Earth was profoundly alien. How do we distinguish between the living and non-living in the fossil record?

Sophia Roosth


Female black widows have a murderous reputation, but do the males have it coming?

6 minutes

Idea/History of Science

What a fossil revolution reveals about the history of ‘big data’

David Sepkoski


Animal agents

Can they shape their own lives? Or the course of history? It's time to reconsider the significance of animal agency

Amanda Rees


Why do domesticated animals tend to have floppy ears, short snouts and lighter skin?

3 minutes

Idea/Human Evolution

The red and green specialists: why human colour vision is so odd

James Higham