Discover the astounding, pulsing life of a seemingly immobile coral reef

Corals and sponges, the undersea lifeforms that make up much of coral reefs, appear still and impassive to the naked eye, unless caught in a current or brushed by another animal. However, in order to survive they’re always in motion, growing slowly and moving to secure sunlight and to prey on zooplankton. Shot over the course of nine months, Slow Life use time-lapse to stunning effect, transforming the creeping, gentle movements of these creatures into colourful pulsations, undulations, and bursts of life.

Video by BioQuest Studios

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Essay/Physics

Time after time

The question of whether time moves in a loop or a line has occupied human minds for millenia. Has physics found the answer?

Paul Halpern

Video/History of Science

People have been trying to talk with apes for nearly a century. How far have we got?

8 minutes

Idea/Biology

Proof of life: how would we recognise an alien if we saw one?

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Essay/History of Science

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Video/Human Evolution

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4 minutes

Idea/Biology

I, holobiont. Are you and your microbes a community or a single entity?

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