Massimo Pigliucci is professor of philosophy at City College and at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is the author of How to Be a Stoic: Ancient Wisdom for Modern Living (2017) and his most recent book is A Handbook for New Stoics: How to Thrive in a World Out of Your Control (2019), co-authored with Gregory Lopez. 

How the Stoic embrace of death can help us get a grip on life

Founded in Athens during the 3rd century BC, Stoicism flourished for some 500 years throughout Greece and the Rome. Preceded and inspired by the Cynics, the Stoics valued reason, virtue and an acceptance of circumstance. In this Aeon Video original interview, the City College of New York professor of philosophy – and practising Stoic – Massimo Pigliucci discusses how the Stoical view of death still carries meaning in a modern context, from questions of suicide to how to appreciate the good things in life.

Producer: Kellen Quinn

Interviewer: Nigel WarburtonEditor: Adam D'Arpino
View at aeon.co

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