The ‘atomic orderliness’ of crystals forming yield resplendent, microscopic landscapes

Although they may look computer-generated, the micro-images created by Maria Ferreira at the Rhode Island School of Design, examine a very real world ordinarily imperceptible to the human eye. In her short video Lattice, Ferreira uses a polarising filter under an inverted microscope to transform growing crystalline masses into otherworldly prismatic landscapes, revealing the striking beauty and complex geometry of crystal formation.

Director: Maria Constanza Ferreira

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Essay/Physics

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Essay/History of Science

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