The ‘atomic orderliness’ of crystals forming yield resplendent, microscopic landscapes

Although they may look computer-generated, the micro-images created by Maria Ferreira at the Rhode Island School of Design, examine a very real world ordinarily imperceptible to the human eye. In her short video Lattice, Ferreira uses a polarising filter under an inverted microscope to transform growing crystalline masses into otherworldly prismatic landscapes, revealing the striking beauty and complex geometry of crystal formation.

Director: Maria Constanza Ferreira

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Essay/Earth Science

The shape of life

The ancient Earth was profoundly alien. How do we distinguish between the living and non-living in the fossil record?

Sophia Roosth


Female black widows have a murderous reputation, but do the males have it coming?

6 minutes

Idea/History of Science

What a fossil revolution reveals about the history of ‘big data’

David Sepkoski


Animal agents

Can they shape their own lives? Or the course of history? It's time to reconsider the significance of animal agency

Amanda Rees


Why do domesticated animals tend to have floppy ears, short snouts and lighter skin?

3 minutes

Idea/Human Evolution

The red and green specialists: why human colour vision is so odd

James Higham