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Photo by Johan  Warden/Gallery Stock

Essay/
Film and visual culture
The reality show

Schizophrenics used to see demons and spirits. Now they talk about actors and hidden cameras – and make a lot of sense

Mike Jay

Photo by Stephen Tamiesie/Gallery Stock

Essay/
Neurodiversity
Autism from the inside

Too many depictions of autistic people rely on tired clichés. The neurotypical world needs to take note of our own voices

Katherine May

Katy Perry performs during her 'Witness: The Tour' in Detroit, Michigan.  Photo by Scott Legato/Getty

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Beauty and aesthetics
Against popular culture

For Adorno, popular culture is not just bad art – it enslaves us to repetition and robs us of our aesthetic freedom

Owen Hulatt

Anna and Elsa from Frozen (2013). Image courtesy of Disney Inc. All rights reserved

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Film and visual culture
Love isn’t what it was

In a strangely unremarked-upon twist, Disney films have taken to subverting romance and rethinking the happy-ever-afters

Sophus Helle

The work-weathered hands of Henry Brooks, a former slave from Greene County, Georgia, May 1941. Photo by Corbis
Essay/
Ethics
History and guilt

Can America face up to the terrible reality of slavery in the way that Germany has faced up to the Holocaust?

Susan Neiman

Unknown Soviet film courtesy http://dragonflyfilms.blogspot.co.uk
Essay/
Cognition and intelligence
Strange continuity

Throughout evolutionary history, we never saw anything like a montage. So why do we hardly notice the cuts in movies?

Jeffrey M Zacks

From Psycho 1960 by Alfred Hitchcock. Photo by Archive Photos/Getty.
Essay/
Film and visual culture
Neurothriller

It’s not just your imagination. Horror films are much more scary than they were in the past. Here’s how they do it

Patricia Pisters

A still from Chipotle's 'Cultivate a better world' campaign.

Essay/
Economics
Ad nauseam

The more we hate it, the more it agrees with us. How advertising turned anti-consumerism into a secret weapon

Adam Corner

Photo by Frédéric Soltan/Getty

Essay/
Social psychology
Our age of horror

In this febrile cultural moment filled with fear of the Other, horror has achieved the status of true art

M M Owen

Photo by Henry Diltz/Corbis via Getty
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Mood and emotion
A theory of creepiness

A bear chasing you is simply scary but a guy with a big mouse’s head can give you the creeps. What’s the difference?

David Livingstone Smith

Andy Warhol in 1964. Photo by Mario De Biasi/Mondadori/Getty

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Art
Has art ended again?

Ever since Hegel, artists and critics alike have been claiming that art is finished. But what could that actually mean?

Owen Hulatt

Changing work patterns. Photo by Peter Ptschelinzew/Getty

Essay/
Life stages
Kids these days

Millennials are as hard-working as anyone else – so why does pop culture pretend that all we do is party?

James Somers

General Jar Jar Binks in Star Wars Episode 1; The Phantom Menace. Photo courtesy Lucasfilm/20th Century Fox
Essay/
Automation and robotics
Numbing the imagination

CGI has become wearingly dull and cliched. Can its deep weirdness be recovered and filmgoers’ minds stretched again?

Jonathan Romney

Detail from a 1937 poster 'See the Land of the Vikings!' Photo by Corbis
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Film and visual culture
Fantasy North

The top of the globe has always meant fantasy, myth, adventure. What explains the icy northern grip on our imagination?

E R Truitt

Carrefour (Darby Jones) carries an unconscious Jessica Holland (Christine Gordon) in a scene from the 1943 horror film I Walked with a Zombie. Photo by Corbis

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Ethics
The good zombie

The new zombie still eats brains, but it can think, emote and even fall in love. Why zombies with heart are on the rise

Davia Sills

Approaching Kai Tak airport, Kowloon, Hong Kong. Photo by Russ Schleipman/Corbis
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Film and visual culture
Dispatches from the ruins

The human world has become bafflingly complex and strangely fragile making apocalypse the easiest thing to imagine

Frank Bures