Cosmopolitanism


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Beauty and aesthetics Bioethics Comparative philosophy Cosmopolitanism Death Ethics History of ideas Knowledge Logic and probability Meaning and the good life Metaphysics Philosophy of language Philosophy of mind Philosophy of religion Philosophy of science Political philosophy Thinkers and theories Values and beliefs Virtues and vices

A grandmother and granddaughter from Cape Verde. Photo by O. Louis Mazzatenta/National Geographic

Essay/
Demography and migration
The future is mixed-race

And so is the past. Migration and mingling are essential to human success in the past, the present and into the future

Scott Solomon

New York, 1955. Photo by Elliott Erwitt/Magnum

Essay/
Political philosophy
A history of alienation

In the postwar period it was understood to be the fundamental malaise of modern life. Why aren’t we ‘alienated’ any more?

Martin Jay

Storm clouds gather above ships waiting to dock in Singapore. Photo by Edgar Su/Reuters

Essay/
Global history
What is global history now?

Historians cheered globalism with work about cosmopolitans and border-crossing, but the power of place never went away

Jeremy Adelman

Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir having lunch at the “La Coupole” Brasserie, December 1973. Photo by Guy Le Querrec/Magnum

Essay/
Cosmopolitanism
The dimming of the light

With its revolutionary heat and rational cool, French thought once dazzled the world. Where did it all go wrong?

Sudhir Hazareesingh

Who should we care about: queuing for food in Haiti. Photo by William Daniels/Panos

Essay/
Cosmopolitanism
Cosmopolitans

It’s not just me, you and everyone we know. Citizens of the world have moral obligations to a wider circle of humanity

Nigel Warburton

Photo by Bloomberg/Getty

Essay/
Nations and empires
Why nation-states are good

The nation-state remains the best foundation for capitalism, and hyper-globalisation risks destroying it

Dani Rodrik

A Polaroid of an unaccompanied child following the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Such images were displayed on bulletin boards at NGOs. Photo by Jenny Matthews/Panos

Essay/
Cosmopolitanism
The essence of evil

You don’t have to be a monster or a madman to dehumanise others. You just have to be an ordinary human being

David Livingstone Smith

Katrina Esau, one of the last remaining speakers of a Khoisan language that was thought extinct nearly 40 years ago, teaches her native tongue to a group of school children in Upington, South Africa on 21 September 2015. Photo by Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty

Essay/
Philosophy of language
The death of languages

Endangered languages have sentimental value, it’s true, but are there good philosophical reasons to preserve them?

Rebecca Roache

A crucifix hangs on a wall map of Europe in a school classroom in Rome, November 3, 2009. Photo by Tony Gentile/Reuters

Essay/
Cosmopolitanism
How to hobble religion

Contrary to popular belief, migration from Muslim countries is one reason why Europe is becoming more secular, not less

Ronan McCrea

At a crossroads in the Maitama district of Abuja, Nigeria. Photo by Kassim Braimah

Essay/
Cosmopolitanism
This is your morning

I left the US, the land of my birth, sickened by racial injustice. But the return to a homeland is not a simple matter

Enuma Okoro

The United Nations General Assembly, October 2012. Photo courtesy Wikimedia

Essay/
Cosmopolitanism
All for one

World government is back, in geopolitics and in the academy, but what does the future hold for it?

Luis Cabrera

Reading in a tea shop in Istanbul. Photo by Louis Grandadam/Getty

Essay/
Stories and literature
Readers of the world unite

How markets, Marx, and provincial elites created world literature to fight both empire and nationalism

Martin Puchner

Hannah Arendt in 1944. Photo by Fred Stein/Corbis

Essay/
Cosmopolitanism
Shadow and substance

Hannah Arendt knew how to be a pariah. Is that the key to being a 21st-century cosmopolitan?

James McAuley

France, 1950. Photo by Mark Kauffman/LIFE/Getty

Essay/
Nations and empires
Les Anglo-Saxons

Not just American or British, the Anglo-Saxon is a mirror to Frenchness: the country’s alter-ego and most feared enemy

Emile Chabal

With the appearance of the first rays of the sun from Cerro Huantajaya in Alto Hospicio, northern Chile, people celebrate the arrival of the Aymara New Year, Machaq Mara, and the arrival of new energies. Photo courtesy Gobierno Regional de Tarapacá/Flickr

Idea/
Cognition and intelligence
What happens to cognitive diversity when everyone is more WEIRD?

Kensy Cooperrider