Mood and emotion


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Addiction Ageing and death Childhood and adolescence Cognition and intelligence Consciousness and altered states Family life Gender and identity Language and linguistics Life stages Love and friendship Mental health Mood and emotion Neurodiversity Neuroscience Personality Pleasure and pain Psychiatry and psychotherapy Self-improvement Sex and sexuality Sleep and dreams Social psychology Spirituality Teaching and learning Technology and the self Wellbeing
Photo by Kosuke Okahara
Essay/
Addiction
Why self-harm?

Cutting brings relief because emotion and pain criss-cross in the brain. Can we untangle the circuits and stop self-harm?

Carrie Arnold

Big Burger by Tjalf Sparnaay 2015, 180 x 120 cm, oil on linen. Courtesy Bernarducci Meisel Gallery New York

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Mood and emotion
The hunger mood

Hunger isn’t in your stomach or your blood-sugar levels. It’s in your mind – and that’s where we need to shape up

Michael Graziano

Ostend, Belgium, 1988. Photo by Harry Gruyaert/Magnum Photos

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Mental health
Depressive realism

We keep chasing happiness, but true clarity comes from depression and existential angst. Admit that life is hell, and be free

Julie Reshe

Photo by David Pollack/Corbis/Getty

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Mood and emotion
The happiness ruse

How did feeling good become a matter of relentless, competitive work; a never-to-be-attained goal which makes us miserable?

Cody Delistraty

Photo by B Anthony Stewart/National Geographic/Getty

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Mood and emotion
Against cheerfulness

Practising the Greek virtues of wisdom and courage is one thing. But being cheerful the American way borders on psychosis

Mariana Alessandri

Slender meanings: ‘Atmosphere is the all-important thing' in weird fiction, wrote H P Lovecraft. Illustration by Lee Moyer

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Information and communication
Creepypasta

With a flood of dark memes and viral horror stories, the internet is mapping the contours of modern fear

Will Wiles

Photo by Ilya Naymushin/Reuters

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Love and friendship
Buddhists in love

Lovers crave intensity, Buddhists say craving causes suffering. Is it possible to be deeply in love yet truly detached?

Lisa Feldman Barrett & John Dunne

Detail from Hotel Room (1931) by Edward Hopper. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

Essay/
Cities
Me, myself and I

Loneliness can be a shameful hunger, a shell, a dangerous landscape of shadowy figures. But it is also a gift

Olivia Laing

Photo by Gallery Stock
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Meaning and the good life
Worried well

Since ancient times philosophy has tried to cure us of anxiety. But worry is an important part of being a moral person

Charlie Kurth

Photo by Jean-François Monnot/EyeEm/Getty

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Love and friendship
Real love stories

Romantic expectations are often ridiculous and unhelpful, but attachment science can guide us to real and lasting love

Sue Johnson

‘You never stop grieving...’ Laurent Fignon lost the 1989 Tour de France by eight seconds after more than 3000 km of racing. Photo by Jean-Yves Ruszniewski/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images
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Self-improvement
Don’t beat yourself up

Learning to be kind to yourself when you (inevitably) make mistakes could have a remarkable effect on your happiness

Mark Leary

 What Freedom! 1903 by Ilya Repin. The Russian Museum, St Petersburg. Courtesy Wikimedia

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Gender and identity
Romantic regimes

Love in the West is consumerist – we choose a partner to give us what we think we need. But Russians do things differently

Polina Aronson

Austin, Texas. 1963. Photo by Thomas Hoepker/Magnum

Essay/
Social psychology
Rejection kills

The brain makes no distinction between a broken bone and an aching heart. That’s why social exclusion needs a health warning

Elitsa Dermendzhiyska

Hill or Everest? Photo by Ascent Media/Getty
Essay/
Mood and emotion
Psychology’s power tools

Cognitive behavioural therapy has created interventions that truly help people to change. Here are the best of them

David A Sbarra