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A woodcut of Nuremberg from the Nuremberg Chronicle 1493. Photo courtesy Wikipedia

Essay/
Cities
Return of the city-state

Nation-states came late to history, and there’s plenty of evidence to suggest they won’t make it to the end of the century

Jamie Bartlett

Photo by Ernst Haas/Getty

Essay/
Cities
The end of walking

In Orwellian fashion, Americans have been stripped of the right to walk, challenging their humanity, freedom and health

Antonia Malchik

Detail from Hotel Room (1931) by Edward Hopper. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

Essay/
Cities
Me, myself and I

Loneliness can be a shameful hunger, a shell, a dangerous landscape of shadowy figures. But it is also a gift

Olivia Laing

People make their way amid debris near the World Trade Center in New York, 11 September 2001. Photo by Gulnara Samoilova/AP/PA

Essay/
Cities
The intimacy of crowds

Crowds aren’t really crazed – they are made of highly co-operative individuals driven to shared interests and goals

Michael Bond

All illustrations by Susie Cagle
Essay/
Cities
Homes for the homeless

San Francisco’s homeless are harangued and despised while conservative Utah has a radically humane approach

Susie Cagle

Photo by Kevin R. Morris/Corbis

Essay/
Economics
The American cloud

The cosy coastal world of pretend farmers’ markets bears no resemblance to the actual back end of America

Venkatesh Rao

Photo by Getty
Essay/
Architecture
Streets with no game

Boring cityscapes increase sadness, addiction and disease-related stress. Is urban design a matter of public health?

Colin Ellard

Detail from Cerro Rico and the Imperial Municipality of Potosí (1758), by Gaspar Miguel de Berrío. Courtesy Museo Universitario Charcas, Sucre, Bolivia/AKG
 

Essay/
Cities
The first global city

High in the Andes, Potosí supplied the world with silver, and in return reaped goods and peoples from Burma to Baghdad

Kris Lane

Hans Baluschek’s Großstadtlichter (1931), oil on canvas. Stadtmuseum, Berlin. Photo of painting courtesy of Michael Setzpfandt

Essay/
Cities
A metropolitan world

Urbanisation might be the most profound change to human society in a century, more telling than colour, class or continent

Michael Goebel

Architect impression of the proposed new Google HQ in California. Image courtesy Google / BIG / Heatherwick Studio
Essay/
Cities
Work imitates life

The utopian workplace is here, complete with roof gardens, therapists and time to nap. Can the employee ever escape?

Benjamin Naddaff-Hafrey

BABEL IID Arcology, elevation, population 550,000. From "Arcology: City in the Image of Man", original publication 1970. Photo courtesy Cosanti Foundation
Essay/
Architecture
Desert utopia

It might be pleasing to dream of arcologies, mega-cities, and space colonies – but no one can design the perfect human community

Jared Keller

When urbanism reaches a particular pitch of intensity; view towards Battersea power station, London. Photo by JH Images/Getty
Essay/
Architecture
The concrete tangle

The urge to tidy up cities is deadening – let’s celebrate the tangled chaos and honky-tonk energy that keep them alive

Will Wiles

Photo by Tim Flach/Getty

Essay/
Cities
Bugged

Bed bugs crawl under our covers, suck our blood and disappear, leaving us on a razor’s edge between reality and delusion

Brooke Borel

A father and son walk through a park in Weehawken, New Jersey, getting a choice view of the Manhattan city skyline June 21, 2013. Photo by Gary Hershorn/Reuters

Essay/
Architecture
Modern-day flâneur

Theories and demographics are all very well, but to know New York City’s inner life you need to walk and talk

William Helmreich

Threadneedle Street, London, 2012. Photo by Trent Parke/Magnum

Essay/
Cities
City on mute

When you stare at your phone or use Uber to navigate your neighbourhood, you flatten the rich texture of urban life

Kathleen Vandenberg

Wild geese in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, New York City, USA, 2017. Photo by Rebecca Norris Webb from the book Brooklyn, the City Within with Alex Webb/Magnum Photos

Essay/
Nature and landscape
A place of silence

Our cities are filled by the hubbub of human-made noise. Where shall we find the quietness we need to nurture our spirit?

Liam Heneghan

Amsterdam Avenue, dramatically reconfigured. As dependency on private cars wanes, the space would be recuperated for public transportation, agriculture, waste management, bikes and pedestrians. All images supplied by the author

Essay/
Cities
Empire state of mind

Green living in NYC need not be simple living – think skyscraper farms, meat-production towers and revamped aqueducts

Michael Sorkin