Your inner life

5 minutes

Antibiotics make our guts less diverse. That’s bad news for our long-term health

Like any ecosystem, the human microbiome requires diversity to thrive. However, widespread antibiotic treatments have killed off as many as half the important bacteria in our guts. In this animated short, Martin Blaser, director of the NYU Human Microbiome Program, explains why focusing on bacterial diversity is a health imperative.

Director: Flora Lichtman

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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.
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But we can’t do it without you.

Essay/
Old Age & Death
Die like a dog

Pet dogs often have a peaceful death that forestalls protracted suffering and pain. Why can’t we do the same for humans?

Joseph Pierre

Essay/
Genetics
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War, famine and persecution inflict profound changes on bodies and brains. Could these changes persist over generations?

Pam Weintraub