Frame 394

30 minutes

Can video of the police shooting an unarmed civilian ever be viewed objectively?

Among the rash of killings of unarmed black men by law enforcement in the United States, the shooting in April 2015 of Walter Scott in North Charleston, South Carolina gained notoriety when it was caught on a shaky smartphone, and then broadcast across the globe. Frame 394 follows the Canadian writer, designer and architect Daniel Voshart, whose determination to find out the truth in the case spurred him to work on digital recreations and stabilisation of the video, which surpassed work done by professionals, including the FBI. Originally drawn to case by reports that Michael Slager, the policeman who shot Scott, had planted a taser at the scene, Voshart eventually finds that only the defendant’s lawyers are interested in his research and analysis – a scenario that leaves him with very difficult decisions to make: with the incendiary case already driven by conflicting political, legal and social agendas, is it possible for his work to be used in the pursuit of truth and justice?

Director: Rich Williamson

Producer: Shasha Nakhai

Website: Compy Films

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