Marrying me

10 minutes

‘Getting married is an invention’: one woman’s choice to self-marry

When Jennifer Hoes married herself at a ceremony in Haarlem in The Netherlands in 2003, she became a minor tabloid sensation, portrayed by media outlets as, by turns, lonely, self-centered, and a laughing stock. But when viewed from Jennifer’s perspective 10 years later, the act transforms into a powerful expression of individuality, and an invitation for others to set their own path. In Marrying Me, Jennifer reflects on her decision, including how her father’s death when he was 30, influenced her, while arguing that people too often live according to arbitrary societal rules.

Director: Chloe White

Video/Cities

A poetic tour through Detroit's abandoned, ghostly Packard Automotive Plant

7 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/History of Science

‘I could not but wonder at it’: history’s first glimpses into the microbial world

7 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Childhood & Adolescence

Five-month-old babies know what’s funny

Gina Mireault

Video/Childhood & Adolescence

Why the ‘exotic and strange’ world of childhood is ripe for horror

5 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Essay/Family Life

Latte pappas

Sweden’s hands-on dads represent an alternate male form forged by lowered testosterone and the potent hormones of attachment

Richard W Orange

Idea/Social Psychology

People are intensely loyal to groups which abuse newcomers. Why?

Christopher Kavanagh

Video/Gender & Sexuality

A boy wants to wear a red dress in a photo with his dad, but doesn’t quite dare

9 minutes

Essay/Neuroscience

Here’s looking at you

Filmmakers have tapped laws of perception still unexplored by neuroscience to create a visual feast in the brain

Jeffrey M Zacks