Unendurable line

2 minutes

Going from A to B isn’t always a straight line – but it can be very good fun

Created for the Japanese educational TV programme Design Ah, this brief, boisterous video demonstrates the concept of mathematical thresholds, where an A-to-B change occurs once a certain value is exceeded. Combining a lively score with a series of clever demonstrations, Unendurable Line is equal parts concept explainer and pure, short-form internet video fun.

Director: Daihei Shibata

Composer: Fukushima Yasuharu

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