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Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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Look up! The billion-bug highway you can’t see

4 minutes

Out of sight above us swarms of insects are riding their own mass-transit system

To us, a clear blue sky on a summer day might be synonymous with peace and serenity, but that’s only because we’re firmly planted on the ground and our vision is limited. Overhead, many thousands of feet in the air, billions (and billions and billions) of creatures we usually see humming only a few feet above the ground are in mass transit. Animated by Benjamin Arthur and reported by Radiolab’s Robert Krulwich, Look Up! The Billion-bug Highway You Can’t See examines the surprising, hidden world of airborne insects. You can read more on NPR’s website.

Producer: Jessica Goldstein, Maggie Starbard, Ellen Webber

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/Biology
The minds of plants

From the memories of flowers to the sociability of trees, the cognitive capacities of our vegetal cousins are all around us

Laura Ruggles

Essay/Earth Science
Life goes deeper

The Earth is not a solid mass of rock: its hot, dark, fractured subsurface is home to weird and wonderful life forms

Gaetan Borgonie & Maggie Lau