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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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As I am

14 minutes

A boy who died and came back to life reveals what survival means to him

Chris Dean’s heart stopped when he was two. He died but he came back. When he was five, his father was murdered, his body riddled with more than 20 bullets in a gang shootout. As I Am floats through this remarkable young man’s landscape, revealing the lives that have shaped his outlook. Ultimately, Chris’s trenchant perspective on all that he sees moves from the bleakness of poverty and pain to a powerful vision of survival and a reason for being in this world.

Director: Alan Spearman

Producer: Alan Spearman, Mark Adams, Chris Dean, The Commercial Appeal

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/Rituals & Celebrations
Who first buried the dead?

Evidence of burial rites by the primitive, small-brained Homo naledi suggests that symbolic behaviour is very ancient indeed

Paige Madison

Essay/Music
Music is not for ears

We never just hear music. Our experience of it is saturated in cultural expectations, personal memory and the need to move

Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis