Venus flytraps: jaws of death

3 minutes

A hair-trigger existence – the extreme peril of feasting on Venus flytrap nectar

One of the most deceptive members of the plant kingdom, the Venus flytrap lures insects and arachnids onto its leaves with the promise of sweet nectar, only to snap shut, trapping its unsuspecting prey once its motion-sensing hairs are triggered. This harrowing extract from BBC’s ‘Life Story’, featuring hungry flies getting caught in the plants’ clutches, shows that even in the absence of brains, life can be startlingly cunning.

Video by BBC’s ‘Life Story

Narrator: David Attenborough

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