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Balan the blowpipe maker

6 minutes

Meet the last Borneo villager who still crafts his own blowpipe for hunting

A member of the Penan tribe on the island of Borneo, Balan is the last elder in his village who practices the craft of blowpipe making. The Penan blowpipe is a traditional hunting weapon with a unique design, and it can be crafted only with intense care and tireless manual labour. Balan the Blowpipe Maker is an excerpt from Ross Harrison’s 30-minute documentary Sunset Over Selungo, which profiles several members of the Penan tribe as their way of life is threatened by the effects of climate change and deforestation in the Borneo rainforest.

Director: Ross Harrison

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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