Brigid Hains
Editorial Director and Co-Founder, Aeon+Psyche

Deeply interested in the nexus between the human and natural worlds, Brigid was trained as an environmental historian, has taught history and philosophy of science, and studied human ecology and anthropology. Never entirely at home in the academic world, she finds the wide-ranging interests of Aeon+Psyche a profoundly satisfying outlet for her sense of curiosity. In addition to supporting Paul’s overall direction of Aeon+Psyche, Brigid directs the editorial team to ensure that the vision of the magazines is manifest in our publishing programme. She works closely with our commissioning editors, photo editor, video programmers and production team, with the aspiration that our offerings are humane, diverse, thoroughly researched and brought to aesthetically pleasing life every week in both magazines. Outside of her work at Aeon+Psyche, Brigid is a member of the Melbourne Humanities Foundation, the Human Ecology Research Group at University College London, and the British Museum Friends Advisory Council, as well as a committed supporter of Indigenous education in Melbourne. You can find Brigid on Twitter @brigidhains.

Edited by Brigid Hains

Photo by Jeffrey Greenberg/UIG/Getty

Essay/
The environment
A vision for agriculture

We know how to replace toxic, intensive livestock raising with beautiful, efficient grasslands. Do we have the will?

Randall D Jackson

Wild geese in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, New York City, USA, 2017. Photo by Rebecca Norris Webb from the book Brooklyn, the City Within with Alex Webb/Magnum Photos

Essay/
Nature and landscape
A place of silence

Our cities are filled by the hubbub of human-made noise. Where shall we find the quietness we need to nurture our spirit?

Liam Heneghan

Margaret Mead photographed at the American Museum of Natural History, New York, 1930. Photo by Irving Browning/The New York Historical Society/Getty

Essay/
Anthropology
The meaning of Margaret Mead

Mead argued that non-Western cultures offered alternative (often better) ways to be human. Why was she so vilified for it?

Sam Dresser

A firefighter battling the King Fire in Fresh Pond, California, on 17 September 2014. Photo by Noah Berger/Reuters

Essay/
Deep time
The planet is burning

Wild, feral and fossil-fuelled, fire lights up the globe. Is it time to declare that humans have created a Pyrocene?

Stephen J Pyne

Adoration of the Magi (1423) by Gentile da Fabriano. Courtesy Uffizi Gallery, Florence/Wikipedia

Essay/
History
Wonder works

History and philosophy should reveal to us the baffling, strange and wondrous qualities of other lives and other times

Marnie Hughes-Warrington

At the Remembrance Day ceremony at Old City Hall in Toronto, 11 November 2014. Photo by Mark Blinch/Reuters

Essay/
Human evolution
United by feelings

Universal emotions are the deep engine of human consciousness and the basis of our profound affinity with other animals

Stephen T Asma & Rami Gabriel

Déesse V Nine Goodbye Kisses by Delphine Lebourgeois

Essay/
Cognition and intelligence
Women’s minds matter

Feminists never bought the idea of the computational mind set free from its body. Cognitive science is finally catching up

Sally Davies

Omar ibn Said c1850. Digitally colourised. Omar ibn Said’s autobiography is the only known extant autobiography of a slave written in Arabic in America. It was not edited by his owner, as those of other slaves written in English were, and is therefore surmised to be more authentic. It also attests to the high level of education that existed in Africa at the time and also reveals that many Africans who were brought to the United States as slaves were followers of Islam. Public domain via the Beinecke Library/Yale University

Essay/
History
Muslims of early America

Muslims came to America more than a century before Protestants, and in great numbers. How was their history forgotten?

Sam Haselby

Photo by Frederick Florin/AP/Getty

Essay/
Teaching and learning
The growth mindset problem

A generation of schoolchildren is being exhorted to believe in their brain’s elasticity. Does it really help them learn?

Carl Hendrick

At Wounded Knee, South Dakota, 1984. Photo by Pierre Perrin/Gamma-Rapho/Getty

Essay/
Genetics
Haunted by history

War, famine and persecution inflict profound changes on bodies and brains. Could these changes persist over generations?

Pam Weintraub

Deer roadkill on the highway in Texas. Photo by Bob Anderson/Getty

Essay/
The environment
Snarge

Our insatiable desire for acceleration exacts a mortal toll on the animal world. It’s time for humans to slow right down

Gary Kroll

Sisters, Pennsylvania, 1962. Photo by Eve Arnold/Magnum

Essay/
Pleasure and pain
Enjoy!

Philosophers have traditionally been highly suspicious of fleeting pleasures, but to enjoy the moment is a radical act

Sandy Grant

A family of four wild albino whitetail deer in Wisconsin. Photo by Michael Crowley/Getty

Essay/
The environment
To hunt or not to hunt?

Debates about whether to protect these ghostly white deer demonstrate deep connections between our humanity and the hunt

Curt Meine

Eland antelopes, buffalos and humans, Republic of South Africa, Harrismith, Balmoral 8,000-2,000 BCE. Watercolour by Maria Weyersberg, 1929. Courtesy Frobenius-Institut Frankfurt am Main

Essay/
Human evolution
Imagination is ancient

Our imaginative life today has access to the pre-linguistic, ancestral mind: rich in imagery, emotions and associations

Stephen T Asma

The Ain Sakhri lovers figurine. This is the oldest known representation of sexual intercourse in the world, dated c10,000 BCE. Photo courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum

Essay/
Human evolution
Sex makes babies

As far as we can tell, no other animal knows this. Did our understanding of baby-making change the course of human history?

Holly Dunsworth & Anne Buchanan

Daoist power: Herding Horses by Han Gan, Tang dynasty, China. Photo courtesy the National Palace Museum, Taipei/Wikipedia

Essay/
Fairness and equality
In defence of hierarchy

As a society we have forgotten how to talk about the benefits of hierarchy, expertise and excellence. It’s time we remembered

Stephen C Angle, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Julian Baggini and others

Believe in better… Photo by Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty

Essay/
Self-improvement
The self-help game

Millions believe that pop psychology can change their tennis skills, their love life or their moods. Are they all wrong?

Rami Gabriel

Recent comments