Menu
Donate
SIGN IN

Sam Grinsell

Urban Historian, University of Antwerp, Belgium

Sam Grinsell is a historian of the built environment. He has just completed his PhD at the University of Edinburgh and taken up a postdoctoral position at the Centre for Urban History at the University of Antwerp.

Written by Sam Grinsell



Recent Comments

Philosophy’s systemic racism

Sam Grinsell

Thank you for this valuable effort to confront racism within a philosophical tradition while acknowledging that said tradition also has potential uses in seeking a freer world. I’m mostly commenting to say that I found this a very thoughtful piece which is being done something of a disservice by some of the readers in these comments, who I fear have been a little distracted by the title.

I’d love to hear more about the encounter of anticolonial and postcolonial thinkers with Hegel. Who are the writers from the global south who are grappling with these questions today?

→ See comment

What do shoes do?

Sam Grinsell

I enjoyed reading this very much. Like Tim Ingold’s work on walking, it encouraged me to focus on the everyday performance and creation of the self through the body and (in this case) its technological extension. I am thinking a lot about water at the moment, and the coastal setting for your reflections caught my attention: there’s an intriguing relationship between water and land, in that many of us take off our footwear to enter the sea, a river, a lake, a pool. Of course, swimming footwear exists in the form of flippers but these are a specialist piece of kit, not something most of us use every time we go in the water. So as well as the sandy beach being an invitation to expose our toe...

READ MORE→ See comment

Angels in the market

Sam Grinsell

Thank you for this very interesting and convincing analysis. I wonder if you have thoughts on how this process fits into global patterns of exploitation, for example the ways in which underpaid work is outsourced to poorer countries as a process of maintaining the wealth of richer countries? You mention that there is a peculiarly American kind of forgetfulness of racial oppression, but aren’t there parallels in British, Dutch or French attitudes to empire, and Australian or Canadian views of indigenous peoples? Of these are not the same, but are there connections in how an imagined white space is projected through images of the nuclear family at home?

→ See comment