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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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The way of the dodo

7 minutes

A playful paean to glorious celluloid and the magic of cinema

Starting as a ‘rewind boy’ at his local cinema in east London in the days when film prints had to be reset by hand, Ümit Mesut has since made it his mission to keep celluloid alive. He’s converted his shop Ümit and Son – once a video and general store – into a haven for likeminded cinephiles on the lookout for old and rare prints and projectors, and he tirelessly scours conventions for films to add to his collection. Ümit’s love for film is contagious and gets at something fundamental about collecting – those who dedicate themselves to preserving what the rest of us might overlook are keeping our history and memories alive.

Director: Liam Saint-Pierre

Producer: Liam Saint-Pierre

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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