The sinister bobbit worm

5 minutes

Beware the lightning-quick bobbit worm burrowed in the sand on the ocean floor!

Eunice aphroditois, better known as the bobbit worm, is known for burrowing into ocean floors, patiently waiting for passing sea-life to stimulate its exposed antennae and then snatching its prey into a sudden subterranean death, sometimes so quickly that the hapless quarry is sliced in two. The odd-looking creature, which lives in warm oceans throughout the world, can reach lengths of up to 10 feet. The Sinister Bobbit Worm shows Eunice aphroditois pulsing under the ocean floor as it angles for its next meal.

Director: Jose Lachat

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