The sinister bobbit worm

5 minutes

Beware the lightning-quick bobbit worm burrowed in the sand on the ocean floor!

Eunice aphroditois, better known as the bobbit worm, is known for burrowing into ocean floors, patiently waiting for passing sea-life to stimulate its exposed antennae and then snatching its prey into a sudden subterranean death, sometimes so quickly that the hapless quarry is sliced in two. The odd-looking creature, which lives in warm oceans throughout the world, can reach lengths of up to 10 feet. The Sinister Bobbit Worm shows Eunice aphroditois pulsing under the ocean floor as it angles for its next meal.

Director: Jose Lachat

Video/Subcultures

Deep faith and rough rides – life at an evangelical rodeo Bible camp

23 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Neuroscience

Psychiatry is due for a revolution in diagnosis and treatment through brain science

4 minutes

Video/Mathematics

Getting down with squares – the dance styles of geometry

6 minutes

Idea/Ecology & Environmental Sciences

Polar bears need to be fat, and they can’t be without sea ice

Thea Bechshoft

Essay/Epidemiology

Who names diseases?

Swine Flu, Naples Soldier, Ebola. Disease names express fear, create stigma and distract attention. Can they be improved?

Laura Spinney

Video/Evolution

Watch as the whale becomes itself: slowly, slowly, from land to sea, through deep time

10 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Space Exploration

Space exploration is still the brightest hope-bringer we have

Earle Kyle

Video/Ecology & Environmental Sciences

How a tiny group of insects escaped extinction by hiding in a bush for 80 years

20 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Essay/History of Science

The cosmology of Poe

Drawing on intuition, Edgar Allan Poe offered some remarkably prescient ideas about the universe in his poem 'Eureka'

Paul Halpern