Sea urchins pull themselves inside out to be reborn

3 minutes

If a sea urchin survives the incredible tumult of youth, it’s nearly immortal

Sea urchins are members of a tube-footed sea creature family that includes sand dollars and starfish. To reach maturity, they must brave treacherous, extraordinary journeys. Conceived in the open sea from sperm and eggs released by adults, sea urchin larvae develop small, spaceship-shaped exteriors to help them float to a more permanent home. When the time is right to settle down, the spherical larvae turn themselves inside out, revealing a small, many-legged adult that has been growing inside. Part of KQED’s science documentary series Deep Look, this stunning high-definition video chronicles one of nature’s most spectacular transformations.

Producer: Josh Cassidy

Video by KQED Science and PBS Digital Studios

Narrator and Writer: Amy Standen

Video/Childhood & Adolescence

What to make of a Riot Grrrl? A snapshot of feminism and high school in the 1990s

18 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Bioethics

From identity politics to medicine, the DNA revolution demands a new bioethics

6 minutes

Video/Demography & Migration

Amid massive urbanisation and modernisation, rural Japan persists in idiosyncratic corners

30 minutes

Essay/Human Evolution

Sex makes babies

As far as we can tell, no other animal knows this. Did our understanding of baby-making change the course of human history?

Holly Dunsworth & Anne Buchanan

Video/Philosophy of Science

How LSD helped a scientist find beauty in a peculiar and overlooked form of life

6 minutes

Idea/Astronomy

What high-speed astronomy can tell us about the galactic zoo

Christopher Kochanek

Essay/Evolution

Aliens in our midst

The ctenophore’s brain suggests that, if evolution began again, intelligence would re-emerge because nature repeats itself

Douglas Fox

Video/Biology

From egg to the air: 21 days of bee development condensed into one mesmerising minute

1 minutes

Idea/Anthropology

It’s not that your teeth are too big: your jaw is too small

Peter Ungar