Charles Spence: Sensploration

5 minutes

Can you season seafood with ocean sounds? One of the many ways senses interact

Historically, what are considered the five primary human senses – hearing, sight, touch, smell and taste – have been studied as independent phenomena. But according to Charles Spence, professor of experimental psychology at the University of Oxford, this separation is a mistake since our sensory experiences are so intimately intertwined. In this short video commissioned for the 2016 Future of Storytelling summit, Spence demonstrates how his research on the constant interplay between our senses has influenced a new generation of researchers and marketers, and elaborates on some of the most common and surprising ways in which we experience multisensory perception every day.

Director: Liam Saint-Pierre

Producer: Liam Saint-Pierre, Ross Williams

Website: Future of Storytelling

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