Our voices are rarely heard

5 minutes

‘Continuously, silently screaming’ – the profound agony of solitary confinement

‘Thank you for taking your time to hear my voice, because our voices are rarely heard.’

Given unusual access to California’s Pelican Bay State Prison, one of the most notorious super-maximum security prisons in the United States, the filmmaker Cali Bondad and the reporter Gabrielle Canon interviewed several inmates in solitary confinement, also known as the Special Housing Unit (SHU). The resulting short film, Our Voices Are Rarely Heard, powerfully juxtaposes images of incarceration and freedom as inmates describe the monotony, hopelessness and anguish that characterise spending 22.5 hours of every day in the confines of an 8ft by 10ft cell – roughly the area of a king-size bed.

Director: Cali Bondad

Producer: Gabrielle Canon

Website: Sister

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