Slow life

4 minutes

Discover the astounding, pulsing life of a seemingly immobile coral reef

Corals and sponges, the undersea lifeforms that make up much of coral reefs, appear still and impassive to the naked eye, unless caught in a current or brushed by another animal. However, in order to survive they’re always in motion, growing slowly and moving to secure sunlight and to prey on zooplankton. Shot over the course of nine months, Slow Life use time-lapse to stunning effect, transforming the creeping, gentle movements of these creatures into colourful pulsations, undulations, and bursts of life.

Video by BioQuest Studios

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