One breath: the story of William Trubridge

8 minutes

Diving to 100 metres on a single breath takes more than strong lungs and limbs

The premise of freediving is simple – divers start at the water’s surface using only a single breath to sustain themselves deep into the abyss. But at depths approaching 100 metres, they risk losing consciousness and blacking out. Roughly 40 people die each year during freediving attempts, but the world record holder William Trubridge has trained himself to block out worst-case scenarios during his dives so that he can keep pushing deeper. Nicolas Rossier’s profile of Trubridge, One Breath, is a compelling look at the human impulse to test limits, even in the face of extreme risk.

Director: Nicolas Rossier

Producer: Nicolas Rossier

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