One breath: the story of William Trubridge

8 minutes

Diving to 100 metres on a single breath takes more than strong lungs and limbs

The premise of freediving is simple – divers start at the water’s surface using only a single breath to sustain themselves deep into the abyss. But at depths approaching 100 metres, they risk losing consciousness and blacking out. Roughly 40 people die each year during freediving attempts, but the world record holder William Trubridge has trained himself to block out worst-case scenarios during his dives so that he can keep pushing deeper. Nicolas Rossier’s profile of Trubridge, One Breath, is a compelling look at the human impulse to test limits, even in the face of extreme risk.

Director: Nicolas Rossier

Producer: Nicolas Rossier

Video/History of Technology

Breakthroughs, quackery and strange beauty: the afterlife of outmoded medical devices

5 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Neuroscience

A happy life is built on pleasures such as sex and food, but also company and variety

7 minutes

Essay/Wellbeing

Tripping in the ICU

For those suffering the trauma of intensive care, the soothing swoosh of otherworldly ambient music can be a welcome gift

Charles Fernyhough

Idea/Cognition & Intelligence

The bilingual brain: why one size doesn’t fit all

Angela Grant

Video/Cognition & Intelligence

Optical illusions show how past experience dramatically influences perception

4 minutes

Idea/Social Psychology

Dishonesty gets easier on the brain the more you do it

Neil Garrett

Video/Mental Health

An elderly man dedicates himself to saving lives at Japan’s ‘suicide cliffs’

40 minutes

Essay/Neuroscience

Living in the now

She can paint, but not name a painting; learn new music without knowing a tune. Lonni Sue is teaching us much about memory.

Michael D Lemonick