EXCLUSIVE

Take me to the Moon

15 minutes

My little piece of privacy

3 minutes

Three pioneers who predicted climate change

5 minutes

Peter and Ben

10 minutes

Sunken films

11 minutes

Drudgery and dance lessons – work-life balance and the ‘Chinese Dream’

The so-called Chinese Dream is a living ideal for Qian Anhua, a textiles factory owner who describes his enterprise as one that can ‘feed my soul and the soul of my workers’. While the work is menial and quarters cramped at his factory in Hangzhou, China, the monotony of assembly-line labour is offset by group leisure activities such as dance classes and Catalan castell-building. The workers themselves seem appreciative of the entertainment, but their private musings hint at a more complex set of goals and desires than can be easily satisfied by the programme of regimented work and organised fun. An offbeat portrait of modern China, Take Me to the Moon follows a factory veteran and a new arrival as they navigate their hopes and dreams in a peculiarly constructed world, where the borders between work and private life are blurred, and home is far away.

Directors: Oriol Martínez, Enric Ribes

Executive Producer: Oriol Gispert, Weina Kong, Wang Yuanyuan

Cinematographer: Anna Franquesa Solano

Website: Häns

A curtain that twitches as people walk by creates a delightful paradox of privacy

In 2010, the German artist Niklas Roy embarked on a project to take back a small slice of privacy in an era and in a place – his Berlin workshop – where it can be quite hard to come by. The resulting installation, My Little Piece of Privacy, comprised a surveillance camera, ‘computer vision’ software and a small, motorised curtain, which followed pedestrians as they walked past his storefront. As you might imagine, the moving curtain had an inverse (and amusing) effect, causing passersby to spend far more time in front of his window than they would have otherwise. This short video, featuring scenes from the installation set to a retro arcade-inspired score, makes a highly entertaining spectacle out of Roy’s clever provocation of privacy.

Via Colossal

Director: Niklas Roy

Score: Holy Konni

Climate change science is centuries, not decades old, and it was pioneered by a woman

The notion that human activities might be warming the planet started coming into focus in the 1960s and ’70s, before a scientific consensus emerged in the 1980s and ’90s. But the rough outlines of the science surrounding humanity’s greatest contemporary threat has a surprising, little-known history that dates back roughly two centuries. This brief animation from BBC Ideas traces our modern understanding of the greenhouse effect through the work of three pioneering scientists, beginning with the US scientist and women’s rights activist Eunice Foote, whose 1856 work on the heat-trapping effects of CO2 was buried for decades before being rediscovered in 2010.

Video by BBC Ideas

Animator: Peter Caires

After 30 years of solitude, Peter forms an unlikely friendship with a fellow loner

‘I had left my flock, and Ben had left his.’

After taking a walk through a remote Welsh valley, Peter committed himself to a life there, and disconnected from the outside world. In doing so, he found a solitary inner peace – a peace he maintained for nearly three decades, until, one day, he stumbled upon a lamb that had been left for dead. Finding kinship with the fellow ‘dropout’, Peter took the abandoned creature home and named him Ben. The short Peter and Ben (2007) by the UK filmmaker Pinny Grylls captures the duo’s relationship three years after their chance meeting, as Peter attempts to return Ben to the wild. With a melancholic piano score and sweeping views of the Welsh countryside, her touching film lends a lyrical beauty to this tale of unlikely connection and camaraderie between outsiders.

Director: Pinny Grylls

Producer: Victoria Cameron

Score: Will Hood

Trawling for secrets in haunting films recovered from the bottom of the sea

The British ocean liner RMS Lusitania embarked on its infamous final voyage from New York to Liverpool on 1 May 1915. Six days later, torpedoed by German U-boats off the southern coast of Ireland, the ship sank in less than 20 minutes, killing 1,198 passengers and crew, and setting the US on the path to join the fight against Germany in the First World War. One of the most luxurious ocean liners of its time, the Lusitania was equipped with what was then a novelty – an onboard movie theatre.

In Sunken Films, the US artist and filmmaker Bill Morrison uses archival footage to unspool the stories of the sinking of this luxury liner, its incendiary movie reels, as well as other films about or from shipwrecks. One early clip was salvaged from the sunken Lusitania in a 1982 expedition; another mysterious film, featuring the Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin in 1919-20 with his cat, was recovered from a fishing net off the Danish coast in 1976. By trawling for memories in deep-sea shipwrecks, Morrison offers haunting glimpses into early-20th century film and world history.

Director: Bill Morrison

Drudgery and dance lessons – work-life balance and the ‘Chinese Dream’

The so-called Chinese Dream is a living ideal for Qian Anhua, a textiles factory owner who describes his enterprise as one that can ‘feed my soul and the soul of my workers’. While the work is menial and quarters cramped at his factory in Hangzhou, China, the monotony of assembly-line labour is offset by group leisure activities such as dance classes and Catalan castell-building. The workers themselves seem appreciative of the entertainment, but their private musings hint at a more complex set of goals and desires than can be easily satisfied by the programme of regimented work and organised fun. An offbeat portrait of modern China, Take Me to the Moon follows a factory veteran and a new arrival as they navigate their hopes and dreams in a peculiarly constructed world, where the borders between work and private life are blurred, and home is far away.

Directors: Oriol Martínez, Enric Ribes

Executive Producer: Oriol Gispert, Weina Kong, Wang Yuanyuan

Cinematographer: Anna Franquesa Solano

Website: Häns

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