EXCLUSIVE

An all-encompassing light

21 minutes

Hiroshima was bombed in 1945. The scars it left are still raw and shocking

On 6 August 1945, as Lee Jong Keun ran across the bridge that would bring him to the Hiroshima steam-train factory where he worked, there was a bright flash of light and he was thrown to the ground. Hiroshima had been bombed. In An All-Encompassing Light, Lee walks through the city streets in the present day, recalling the bombing and its aftermath: the collapsed buildings and lost friends, the excruciating burns he suffered and, most shockingly, the lasting discrimination against survivors. Lee worries that the tragedy is slowly being forgotten, and tells his story – a story he kept secret for decades – in order to remember friends and family, and to reveal the lingering effects of the bombing.

Director: Chloe White

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