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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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The truffle hunters

5 minutes

In central Italy, hunting truffles is a loving partnership between man and dog

Prized by chefs for their strong, complex flavour, and highly priced due to their rarity, truffles are, pound-for-pound, one of the most expensive foods in the world. Central Italy’s Marche region is one of the few places on earth where several varieties of truffles grow plentifully and naturally. Still, the comparatively weak noses of humans are not up to tracking truffles even in ideal growing areas. Enter the loyal truffle-hunting dog.

Director: Mirra Fine, Daniel Klein

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/
Anthropology
Infanticide

There is nothing so horrific as child murder, yet it’s ubiquitous in human history. What drives a parent to kill a baby?

Sandra Newman

Essay/
Rituals & Celebrations
Who first buried the dead?

Evidence of burial rites by the primitive, small-brained Homo naledi suggests that symbolic behaviour is very ancient indeed

Paige Madison