The nomad’s ger

2 minutes

Mongolian nomads building a traditional yurt is a master class in cooperation

Roughly 30 per cent of Mongolians live nomadically or semi-nomadically, and the region’s history of nomadism has left an indelible mark on the country’s culture. Easily portable traditional huts known as gers (more commonly referred to by their Russian name, yurts) are still a common sight throughout the Mongolian steppe, and continue to be a practical form of shelter for many people, thousands of years since they were first developed. Set to traditional throat singing, The Nomad’s Ger uses time-lapse video to convey the dazzling, deeply rooted skill and efficiency with which a Mongolian family assembles its home on the open plains in just over an hour.

Producer: Daniel Grossman

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