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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

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EXCLUSIVE

The church of Saint John Coltrane

28 minutes

The ecstasy of jazz, raising consciousness towards a love supreme

‘The worship of God is what we encourage, and we’re using the music of John Coltrane.’ So says Bishop Franzo King, who with his wife, the Reverend Mother Marina King, founded the Saint John Coltrane African Orthodox Church in San Francisco. Since its creation in 1971, it has evolved into the Saint John Will-I-Am Coltrane Church. The vibe is a rapturous out-of-your-head-ness, where instead of the choir and the hymn book there is the sinuous, transcendent music of the jazz-saint, John Coltrane.

Director: Gayle Gilman, Jeff Swimmer

Producer: Al Klingenstein

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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