Small brains en masse

10 minutes

The inadvertent art of tiny bodies – stunning, hidden patterns of animal movement

A mesmerising confluence of biology, aesthetics and filmmaking, the ingenious nature photography of Dennis Hlynsky, professor at the Rhode Island School of Design, condenses frames of footage to reveal marvellous patterns in the activities of small creatures. The occasionally eerie effect shows the appearance of intricate trails in the wakes of insects and birds. Works of art in their own right, the clips also double as small-scale investigations into animal movement patterns and flock behaviour.

Director: Dennis Hlynsky

Website: Imagine Science Films

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