Blackout

4 minutes

What happens when the power goes off. Or, how to enjoy a blackout

‘The most ordinary things became kind of extraordinary.’

In the most widespread power outage in the history of North America, the Northeast blackout of 2003 left some 50 million people without power over two days. Combining several distinct animation styles, this short documentary chronicles the eerie, otherworldly and exuberant stories of those who experienced the blackout while living in Toronto, hinting that, if society were to collapse, at the very least there might be live music and a few days’ worth of free beer.

Director: Sharron Mirsky

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