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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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After

7 minutes

A day in the life of Auschwitz today is a mix of history, tourism and prayer

Historians estimate that between 1.1 and 1.5 million men, women and children were murdered at Auschwitz, the largest and most notorious of the Nazi concentration and extermination camps of the Second World War. In 1947, the Polish government established the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum, which has since been visited by about 1.72 million people from around the world. In After, a stark and haunting look at the daily activities of Auschwitz today, the Polish director Lukasz Konopa deftly captures a setting where the horrors of the past and the activities of the present exist side by side.

Director: Lukasz Konopa

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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