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Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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Ripple

3 minutes

A dizzying ‘advertisement for Earth’ shows the beauty and scars of our planet

Described by its American director Conner Griffith as an ‘advertisement for planet Earth’, Ripple consists of a torrent of images contrasting the planet’s natural and developed surfaces. Assembled largely using Google Earth and Wikipedia, Ripple uses overhead shots of cities, port terminals, farmland and even microchips to offer a startling perspective on the profound marks we have left on this planet. The video’s imagery allows us to see the world and its myriad details in fresh ways, suggesting a poetics of technology that can admire human achievement without blindly embracing it.

Director: Conner Griffith

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/Rituals & Celebrations
Who first buried the dead?

Evidence of burial rites by the primitive, small-brained Homo naledi suggests that symbolic behaviour is very ancient indeed

Paige Madison

Essay/Music
Music is not for ears

We never just hear music. Our experience of it is saturated in cultural expectations, personal memory and the need to move

Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis