Bluebird

2 minutes

A poem by Charles Bukowski inspires a sensuous, but fleeting Californian reverie

A sensuous, impressionist take on California, Cooper and Canepari’s small but finely formed Bluebird takes its name and narrative lead from Charles Bukowski’s poem. Bukowski made California his home, and often paid tribute to its strange glamour, and its constant cycling between utopian dreamscape and dystopian asylum. ‘There’s a bluebird in my heart that wants to get out, but I’m too tough for him’ he says here, ‘I pour whiskey on him and inhale cigarette smoke, and the whores and the bartenders, and the grocery clerks, never know that he’s in there.’

Director: Drea Cooper & Zackary Canepari

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