Wanderers

4 minutes

A stunning vision of the possibilities of humanity’s expansion into space

The US astrophysicist and author Carl Sagan was able to make complex scientific questions thoroughly arresting and human – at times even poetic. Set to awe-inspiring digital recreations of strange yet not unfamiliar worlds elsewhere in our solar system, Wanderers takes Sagan’s timeless words on the human instinct for exploration, and imagines what the next stage might look like: to Mars and beyond into space.

Director: Erik Wernquist

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