De herinacio (on the hedgehog)

2 minutes

A whimsical take by 13th-century scientists on why the hedgehog has spikes

Based on a passage from the Rochester Bestiary, a richly illustrated 13th-century text on real and mythical animals, De Herinacio (On the Hedgehog) is a stop-motion animated glimpse into Medieval thought. Relaying a creative interpretation about why hedgehogs have spines in its original Latin, this charming short video from the Polish animator Ala nunu Leszyńska and Discarding Images illuminates a time when animal mythology was used to reinforce Christian morals.

Director: Ala nunu Leszyńska

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