The blind woman who saw rain

4 minutes

After losing her vision, a woman’s sense of sight returns in a strange new way

Following a stroke, Milena Channing lost her vision and was told by doctors in Scotland that she would remain blind for life. Shortly after, she began to notice the outlines of objects in motion – running water, rain, steam from her tea – but her claims were shrugged off as fantasy. Eventually, however, it became clear that certain motion-detecting operations in her brain were still working, despite her primary visual cortex being entirely non-functional. A visual adaptation of a story from US National Public Radio’s news programme All Things Considered, The Blind Woman Who Saw Rain is a fascinating exploration of the complexity of our senses.

Producer: Adam Cole

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