The German who came to tea

8 minutes

An English centenarian’s moving friendship with a German POW during World War II

For Annie Day, who turned 100 in 2012, memories of taking in two German prisoners of war for Christmas holiday at the height of the Second World War remain crystalline, even after seventy years. After learning from her young son that she could entertain nearby POWs for Christmas dinner, she opened her home and shared her wartime rations. Following a surprise visit from one of the prisoners many years later, the two forged a bond that lasted for decades. A moving story of humanity and kindness transcending bellicose times, The German Who Came to Tea is also a meditation on what memories stay with us, and why.

Director: Kerry Kolbe

Producer: Kerry Kolbe

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