The German who came to tea

8 minutes

An English centenarian’s moving friendship with a German POW during World War II

For Annie Day, who turned 100 in 2012, memories of taking in two German prisoners of war for Christmas holiday at the height of the Second World War remain crystalline, even after seventy years. After learning from her young son that she could entertain nearby POWs for Christmas dinner, she opened her home and shared her wartime rations. Following a surprise visit from one of the prisoners many years later, the two forged a bond that lasted for decades. A moving story of humanity and kindness transcending bellicose times, The German Who Came to Tea is also a meditation on what memories stay with us, and why.

Director: Kerry Kolbe

Producer: Kerry Kolbe

Video/History of Technology

Breakthroughs, quackery and strange beauty: the afterlife of outmoded medical devices

5 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Neuroscience

A happy life is built on pleasures such as sex and food, but also company and variety

7 minutes

Essay/Wellbeing

Tripping in the ICU

For those suffering the trauma of intensive care, the soothing swoosh of otherworldly ambient music can be a welcome gift

Charles Fernyhough

Idea/Cognition & Intelligence

The bilingual brain: why one size doesn’t fit all

Angela Grant

Video/Cognition & Intelligence

Optical illusions show how past experience dramatically influences perception

4 minutes

Idea/Social Psychology

Dishonesty gets easier on the brain the more you do it

Neil Garrett

Video/Mental Health

An elderly man dedicates himself to saving lives at Japan’s ‘suicide cliffs’

40 minutes

Essay/Neuroscience

Living in the now

She can paint, but not name a painting; learn new music without knowing a tune. Lonni Sue is teaching us much about memory.

Michael D Lemonick