Born like stars

6 minutes

An underwater journey reveals the strange birthing process of a deep-sea squid

Not easily mistaken for their ‘giant’ cousins, Gonatus onyx are deep-sea squid that grow to just 18 centimetres in mantle length. These small creatures were once largely mysterious to scientists – it wasn’t until the early 21st century that marine biologists learned that the female Gonatus onyx broods its eggs in a cluster between its arms, and not, like all other known squid, by laying the eggs on the ocean floor. Capturing this birthing process with clarity and a sense of wonder, Born Like Stars combines a mesmerising music-box soundtrack with breathtaking deep-sea photography to give the impression of travelling through an alien world.

Director: Brent Hoff

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