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Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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Born like stars

6 minutes

An underwater journey reveals the strange birthing process of a deep-sea squid

Not easily mistaken for their ‘giant’ cousins, Gonatus onyx are deep-sea squid that grow to just 18 centimetres in mantle length. These small creatures were once largely mysterious to scientists – it wasn’t until the early 21st century that marine biologists learned that the female Gonatus onyx broods its eggs in a cluster between its arms, and not, like all other known squid, by laying the eggs on the ocean floor. Capturing this birthing process with clarity and a sense of wonder, Born Like Stars combines a mesmerising music-box soundtrack with breathtaking deep-sea photography to give the impression of travelling through an alien world.

Director: Brent Hoff

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/Biology
The minds of plants

From the memories of flowers to the sociability of trees, the cognitive capacities of our vegetal cousins are all around us

Laura Ruggles

Essay/Earth Science
Life goes deeper

The Earth is not a solid mass of rock: its hot, dark, fractured subsurface is home to weird and wonderful life forms

Gaetan Borgonie & Maggie Lau