The odd tale of the clever octopus

5 minutes

The wily and merciless veined octopus stalks an unsuspecting rock crab

Known for assembling sea scraps into impromptu forts used for stalking prey, the veined octopus is one of the most cunning predators in the Pacific Ocean’s tropical waters. Setting the tone with a pulsing, ominous score, Jose Lachat’s short nature video features a veined octopus taking cover in a clam shell in a quiet and calculating search for its next meal.

Director: Jose Lachat


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