Meanwhile…

5 minutes

The eerie otherworldliness of slow undersea life sped up to a human pace

Corals, and the echinoderms and funguses that frequently inhabit them, are characterised by their brilliant colours and slow, creeping movements. Set to a pulsing original score by Maurizio Morganti, Meanwhile… speeds up this undersea ecosystem to something resembling a human pace. The result is uncanny, making these familiar lifeforms appear as if born of another planet.

Director: Sandro Bocci

Website: Julia Set Collection

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