Become a
Friend of Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month

Neuroscience: crammed with connections

3 minutes

Can a tiny slice of mouse brain help us understand the complex human mind?

For all the advances in artificial intelligence and neuroscience over the past century, the human brain is still the most intricate and enigmatic machinery on Earth. Scientists are still slowly untangling the brains’s web of profoundly complex connections, seeking the yet elusive knowledge of how it all actually works. This visualisation reconstructs a dustmite-sized slice of a mouse cortex that has been used in recent research. While the mapping reveals much about brain mechanics, it also illustrates the immense challenges scientists face when attempting to map even a minuscule amount of brain material.

Video by Nature

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/
Neurodiversity
The autism paradox

How an autism diagnosis became both a clinical label and an identity; a stigma to be challenged and a status to be embraced

Bonnie Evans

Essay/
Gender & Sexuality
The non-binary brain

Misogynists are fascinated by the idea that human brains are biologically male or female. But they’ve got the science wrong

Emily Willingham