Frank Lloyd Wright: arrogance and ideals

6 minutes

Frank Lloyd Wright on why architecture should be about ideas and ideals

One of the most influential architects and designers of the 19th and 20th centuries, Frank Lloyd Wright helped define modern US architecture through his innovative style, which emphasised harmony between human structures and the natural world. In this 1957 interview, conducted just two years before his death and the opening of his polarising Guggenheim Museum building in 1959, the notoriously outspoken, often arrogant, Wright discusses why he’s wholly unimpressed by New York City’s iconic skyline, and how architecture can change lives for the better by reflecting the highest values of the people it serves – in his case, the ideals he sees in US notions of freedom.

Producer: Amy Drozdowska, David Gerlach

Video by Blank on BlankQuoted Studios

Animator: Jennifer Yoo

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