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Labyrinth

12 minutes

How the deaf experience of music can enrich music for everyone

A fascinating exploration of the diversity of human sensory experience, Labyrinth delves into the often complex relationship between the deaf and music. Interviewing a range of deaf people on their personal experiences, the Greek director Dimitris Papathanasis uncovers a nuanced, heterogenous understanding of music as a combination of visuals, vibrations, rhythm and movement – with as broad a range of feelings and perspectives as you’d expect from any group asked to hold forth on the topic. Closing with a performance of music for the deaf, this short documentary challenges hearing viewers to a new experience of what music can be.

Director: Dimitris Papathanasis


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Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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