Oliver Sacks on ripe bananas

6 minutes

How the ‘Island of the Colourblind’ made Oliver Sacks rethink ‘normal’

In 1993, inspired by H G Wells’s short story ‘The Country of the Blind’ (1904), the renowned neurologist and writer Oliver Sacks set out to study life on Pingelap – a small Micronesian island where an estimated tenth of the population has achromatopsia, a rare genetic disorder that leaves people close to or entirely colourblind. The results of Sacks’s investigation, compiled in his book The Island of the Colorblind (1996) and explored in this brief animation featuring audio excerpted from a 1998 radio interview, attests to the brain’s – and societies’ – astonishing ability to adapt to changing circumstances.

Animator: Patrick Smith

Producer: Amy Drozdowska, David Gerlach

Website: Blank on Blank

Video/Knowledge

Models are always imperfect, and the ones we choose greatly shape our experience

3 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Data & Information

The information age traffics in speed. To adapt to it wisely, we must slow down

5 minutes

Video/Nature & Environment

In the murky waters of climate change, native fishers are among the most vulnerable

7 minutes

Essay/Consciousness & Altered States

What lurks beneath

The grand drama of Freud’s ideas has obscured the reality: every school of psychology needs a theory of the unconscious

Antonio Melechi

Idea/Neuroscience

Why is the brain prone to florid forms of confabulation?

Jules Montague

EXCLUSIVE
Video/Love & Friendship

Meeting your boyfriend’s family is hard. Agata must travel 3,000 miles. And she’s blind

13 minutes

Idea/Neuroscience

The brain-heart dialogue shows how racism hijacks perception

Manos Tsakiris

Essay/Neuroscience

Touched

We ride a stream of naked neurons, stripped of their sheaths, to the most blissful moments and deepest intimacies of life

Steven M Phelps

Video/Social Psychology

Never judge a book by its cover. But what about people and their faces?

12 minutes