Support Aeon

‘Your articles are smart, well written, and enriching. This is what intelligentsia is about.’

Dien H, USA, Friend of Aeon

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
But we can’t do it without you.

Support Aeon

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Support Aeon

Nutag – homeland

6 minutes

Painted frame by frame, a vivid animation restores a history lost to deportation

In 1942, Nazi forces captured a portion of the Kalmyk Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic, home to the Kalmyks – an ethnic group with a language and heritage rooted in Mongolia, most of whom were Tibetan Buddhists. While Kalmyks were predominantly loyal to the Soviet Union throughout the Second World War, and many fought in the Red Army, a small group volunteered to join the Nazi army. Following the Soviet Union’s recapture of Kalmyk territory in December 1943, Soviet authorities declared all Kalmyk people guilty of cooperation with the Nazis and ordered their deportation and exile to Siberia. By the time they were allowed to return home in 1957, roughly half of the Kalmyks had died. The Montreal-based animator Alisi Telengut’s short film Nutag – Homeland is a requiem for the many lives lost during the widespread displacement of the Kalmyk people. Using imagery hand-painted frame by frame, the aching visual poem reflects on a largely forgotten tragedy by blending symbolic motifs with a timeless, mournful folk overtone.

Director: Alisi Telengut


Get Aeon straight
to your inbox
Join our newsletter Sign up
Follow us on
Facebook
Like
Essay/
Human Rights
Speaking on behalf of …

In the tapestry of diverse social groups, the loudest and most extreme get heard. To whom should we actually listen?

Holly Lawford-Smith

Essay/
Gender & Sexuality
Black. Queer. Born again

Black life is world-making, born of gaps and dislocations, imaginative leavings and returns, generative escapes and arrivals

Ashon Crawley