Connecting prisons with nature

7 minutes

Restoring the biodiversity of America’s landscapes – from inside its prisons

In America, 2.3 million people are incarcerated. The prison complex is immense, and its ecological and human costs are extreme. For inmates, prison is a world of iron bars and concrete; isolation and regimentation. Filmed in Stafford Creek Corrections Center in Little Rock, Washington, this short documentary follows a project to re-connect inmates with nature – and with the outside world – through science and sustainability education.

Director: Benjamin Drummond, Sara Joy Steele

Producer: Benjamin Drummond, Sara Joy Steele

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