The amazing life of sand

3 minutes

Sand can be lava, coral, bones, even excrement. What’s on your favorite beach?

Depending on where you are in the world, the sand beneath your feet can be anything from a fragment of a seashell to brine shrimp excrement to a piece of coral – the classification ‘sand’ only means a particle that is smaller than gravel and larger than silt. The Amazing Life of Sand explores the diverse nature of the substance, and the incredible journeys sand particles frequently travel.

Producer: Josh Cassidy, Liz Roth-Johnson

Website: Deep Look

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