Adrift

11 minutes

‘Space junk’ is a calamity in the making and a threat to anyone venturing off Earth

‘Space junk’ – including defunct satellites, rocket fragments and even a spatula that escaped the clutches of the astronaut Piers Sellers – has been an inescapable byproduct of space exploration, with only a few negative consequences so far. But with some 200 million objects bigger than a millimetre in size orbiting the Earth at 17,500 miles per hour, every astronaut knows that they are, in Sellers’s words, ‘playing the odds’. Featuring interviews, archival footage and an inventive bit of narration from one of the most notable pieces of space junk, Cath Le Couteur’s whimsical short film Adrift puts the mounting, cosmic problem of space debris in perspective.

Director: Cath Le Couteur

Website: Project Adrift

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ORIGINAL
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Video/Space Exploration

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Essay/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

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Idea/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

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