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The horsemen

3 minutes

To the horsemen of Almonte, nature is a religion, and herding defines them

For Spain’s Almonte horsemen, a five-centuries-old tradition called ‘La Saca de las Yeguas’ (roughly translated as ‘The Rounding of the Mares’) isn’t just work – it’s central to their identity. Their annual journey through rural Spain helps them preserve a culture and maintain a sense of harmony with their surroundings. Glen Milner’s brief film on the tradition, which combines stunning images of the Spanish countryside with poignant narration from a Spanish horseman, is an inspiring a reflection on the value of bloodlines and a respect for the natural world.

Director: Glen Milner

Producer: Amy Tinkler

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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